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DISPATCHES

 

A regular up-date featuring articles written for publications

all over the world by FCCJ Correspondents

Nuclear scientists claim it is politically dangerous to research Fukushima accident's impact, writes David McNeill in the New York Times.

In the chaotic, fearful weeks after the Fukushima nuclear crisis began, in March 2011, researchers struggled to measure the radioactive fallout unleashed on the public. Michio Aoyama’s initial findings were more startling than most. As a senior scientist at the Japanese government’s Meteorological Research Institute, he said levels of radioactive cesium 137 in the surface water of the Pacific Ocean could be 10,000 times as high as contamination after Chernobyl, the world’s worst nuclear accident. Two months later, as Mr. Aoyama prepared to publish his findings in a short, nonpeer-reviewed article for Nature, the director general of the institute called with an unusual demand — that Mr. Aoyama remove his own name from the paper. Read the article

The Guardian's Justin McCurry reports on the quixotic battle being fought by a determined horse breeder in the shadow of the stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant.

Until March, 2011, Tokue Hosokawa had only to peer through the window of his home in Iitate village to confirm that all was well with his 100-year-old family business. The 130 or so horses that once roamed this sprawling farm have sustained three generations of Hosokawa's family.   Read the article

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